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Gluey Mashed Potatoes (Read 28169 times)
10/08/02 at 08:25:00
Anne Gardiner   Guest

 
Ever wondered why mashed potatoes sometimes have a gluey texture?


If you cook starchy potatoes in too much water; or, if you cook them too long; or if you beat them too vigorously, their starch granules rupture. Out spills trapped liquid and starch giving them a gluey, pasty texture.
 
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Reply #1 - 10/16/02 at 06:28:20
soupy   Ex Member

 
This is especially true in large batches, and don't ever evr make mashed potatoes in the mixer! They'll turn into a gluey mess.
 
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Reply #2 - 10/17/02 at 15:01:53
Julie Renaud   Guest

 
Use red potatoes.  Pour off water and dry over heat.  Use a ricer.  Heat milk and butter before adding to riced potatoes.
 
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Reply #3 - 04/03/03 at 14:13:47
Joanne   Guest

 
There are three types of potatoes, waxy, all purpose and floury.   Floury potatoes are best for mashing. They are generaly dry, floury "old " potatoes.  I live in New Zealand so I don't know what varieties are available to you.  Ask your local greengrocer what ones are floury. They are low in moisture and sugar, and high in startch.

Boil them untill they are tender, drain well, dry them off in the pot over a low heat,  mash them with a hand masher or put them through a potatoe ricer ( NOT a food processor as this will ruin the texture. ie turn them gluey) Then add any liquid, which should be hot for best results. Add butter at the end, mix in well.
 
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Reply #4 - 04/06/03 at 00:50:04
ChefHDAN   Ex Member

 
Monsuier Parmentier, was the first person to really develop most of the methods by which we cook potatoes today.  His one hard fast rule for "proper" whipped potatoes was that they should always be whipped vertically.  So drag out that old fashioned looking contraption and put away the electric mixer.  What type of potatoes?.... Doesn't really matter so long as you cook them right!!  Looking for a short cut?? then use your new fangled microwave to melt the butter, and heat the milk.  You won't have to whip the potatoes as much, AND, your potatoes won't cool as much.  OH you wanna make em taste good TOO?? then fer gawds sakes add the salt and pepper while you're mixing them and taste 'em untill they taste good.  You need a large batch??  OKAY, now you need to use a mixer, BUT, repeat, BUT! pulse the machine and DO NOT WALK AWAY FROM THE MIXER, a careful application of technology is necessary every now and then in the professional kitchen but, steal my potato masher out of my tool box & I'll break your hand !!
 
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Reply #5 - 10/28/03 at 03:30:36
Ramsay Pirate   Guest

 
wanna no how gordon ramsay does his pomme mousseline?!

use ratte potatoes, put them into cold water with salt, thyme and rosemary.
when cooked u need 2 ppl
one needs to burn his hands by taking out the potatoes one by one and peeling them with a knife and cloth, the other puts on a rubber glove and presses not scrapes the peeled potatoes through a wire tammis.
when all is paseed, the potatoe puree is pushed through the tammis again using a plastic scrapper
boil a pan of milk, and melt some butter, but dont boil. add to the hot puree by beating in with a marise.
season. keep warm. when needed, reheat with warm milk, adjust seasoning
 
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Reply #6 - 10/30/03 at 22:18:06
Jim   Ex Member

 
A ricer (that hand-held contraption that looks like a Play Dough toy) does  a fantastic job of creating light & fluffy potatoes. And never cut the potatoes prior to boiling in hopes that it will speed the cooking; sometimes, good taste just can't be rushed!
 
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Reply #7 - 11/12/09 at 00:14:09
vick   Ex Member

 
They are generaly dry, floury "old " potatoes.  I live in New Zealand so I don't know what varieties are available to you.  Ask your local greengrocer what ones are floury. They are low in moisture and sugar, and high in startch.
 
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Reply #8 - 11/06/10 at 08:19:12
aimee2   Ex Member

 
Joane is right about the potatoes you use. It makes a big difference in taste and flavor
 
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Reply #9 - 11/06/10 at 13:36:38
lex42   Ex Member

 
I do agree that the type does make a difference. I like red potatoes boiled or baked and joane is right about the mashed ones.
 
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Reply #10 - 11/08/10 at 20:35:40

Bala123   Offline
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If the water content in it is more then the gluey appearance is predominant.
 
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